June 23, 2024

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Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is closed on the 33rd anniversary of the theft

Boston’s Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum is closed on the 33rd anniversary of the theft

The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston has announced that it will not be open on Saturday, the same day that marks the 33rd anniversary of the museum’s infamous art theft. “We learned that climate activists were planning a protest inside the museum that could endanger our community and our artwork,” said a written statement from a spokesperson. “After careful consideration, and an abundance of caution for the safety of our staff, volunteers, visitors, and belongings, we have made the difficult decision to remain closed for the day.” On March 18, 1990, a $500 million worth of art museum located off Huntington Street near Back by Fence was stolen. Two men disguised as Boston police officers entered the museum by telling a security guard that they were responding to a report of a disturbance, according to authorities. The guard and his colleague were handcuffed and locked in the basement while thieves stole 13 artifacts. Missing pieces include Rembrandt’s only known seascapes, “Christ in the Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee,” and Vermeer’s “The Concert,” one of fewer than 40 known paintings by the 17th-century Dutch painter. Video: From the archives: Art Theft at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum “This protest was intentionally planned to coincide with the anniversary of the art theft that occurred at the Gardner Museum 33 years ago.” Climate activists have been protesting around the world, the museum says, and unfortunately used art museums as a stage to promote their cause. “Isabella Stewart Gardner envisioned her museum as a place for sharing art, community and conversation. She was an advocate for all forms of art, as well as the environment, especially gardening,” said Peggy Fogelman, director of Norma Jean Calderwood, horticulture. “While our mission is to support Isabella’s values, we do not support the genre. It is a tactic that targets art institutions and could endanger the museum’s collection, staff and visitors.”

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The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston has announced that it will not be open on Saturday, the same day that marks the 33rd anniversary of the museum’s infamous art theft.

“We learned that climate activists were planning a protest inside the museum that could endanger our community and our artwork,” said a written statement from a spokesperson. “After careful consideration, and an abundance of caution for the safety of our staff, volunteers, visitors, and holdings, we have made the difficult decision to remain closed for the day.”

On March 18, 1990, artwork worth $500 million was stolen from the museum located off Huntington Street near Back by Fence.

Two men disguised as Boston police officers entered the museum by telling a security guard that they were responding to a report of a disturbance, according to authorities. The guard and his co-worker were handcuffed and locked in the basement while thieves stole 13 artifacts.

Missing pieces include Rembrandt’s only known seascape, Christ in the Storm on the Sea of ​​Galilee, and Vermeer’s The Concert, one of fewer than 40 known paintings by the 17th-century Dutch painter.

Video: From the archives: Art theft at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

“This protest was deliberately planned to coincide with the anniversary of the art theft that occurred at the Gardner Museum 33 years ago,” the museum’s written statement read.

The museum says climate activists have been protesting around the world and, unfortunately, have used art museums as a stage to promote their cause.

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“Isabella Stewart Gardner envisioned her museum as a place for sharing art, community and conversation. She was an advocate for all forms of art, as well as environmentalism, especially gardening,” said Peggy Fogelman, director of Norma Jean Calderwood. “While our mission is to support Isabella’s values, we do not support this type of tactics that target art institutions and could endanger the museum’s collection, staff and visitors.”