Mark Zuckerberg chose not to go to a meeting with Donald Trump

This week Mark Zuckerberg had to take an important decision. The CEO of Facebook must either go to Washington to meet with President Donald Trump along with almost all...

This week Mark Zuckerberg had to take an important decision.

The CEO of Facebook must either go to Washington to meet with President Donald Trump along with almost all other CEOs from the technology industry or miss and prepare for the rally in Chicago on people who have created social support groups in Facebook.

Zuckerberg, who openly criticized the decision of Trump withdrawal of the US from Paris climate agreement in early June, chose the latter, writes in his analysis CNBC.

Facebook was the only one of the five highest-rated American technology companies, which did not send a representative to the meeting in the White House. At the same meeting senior Alphabet – Chairman Eric Emerson Schmidt, sat on a table with Trump and congratulated him on business support, saying it would create “great opportunities” for US companies.

The difference between these two companies, which together dominate the market for digital advertising is huge when it comes to relations with the US government.

But both are in a position of defense in Europe, where their business and their practices are attacked because they are accused of not doing enough to stop the spread of terrorism and do not protect enough personal data of citizens of the European Union (EU).

Google is facing a fine that could surpass 1 billion dollars after the EU said that the company used its monopoly position on the search engines for their shopping services embedded in the search results.

While Schmidt praised Trump’s decision Zuckerberg might very difficult to provide him with help from the administration, while pressure from European capitals becomes larger.

A sign of how seriously Facebook accepts the current political climate in Europe is the fact that the chief operating officer of Facebook Sheryl Sandberg on Wednesday met with the Minister of Interior of British Amber Rudd and highlighted the company’s efforts to “keep terrorists away from Facebook”.

“We had a constructive meeting with the Minister of Interior,” said Sandberg, in response to the comment about the meeting. Journey Sandburg happened just a week after British Prime Minister Theresa May and the French president Emmanuel Macron said they are considering a new law that would punish companies that refuse to remove content, including all forms of hate speech, including calls for terrorism.

The choice of Zuckerberg is certainly a good reputation on Facebook and users who oppose political Trump. And that is good for shareholders in Facebook, or threatens to put the company behind Google’s, is not so clear.

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